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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 194 (some duplicates have been removed)
, like the distance between the nation of afghanistan and the air force base in the u.s. state of nevada. drones come in various shapes, sizes and weights. they are used for surveillance, disablement, and killing. and drones are increasingly ubiquitous. there are 64 drone bases spread across the united states alone, and the u.s. has other drone installations across the planet. africa is increasingly a drone base environment. a newly authorized site in the nation of niger will become the sixth u.s. drone base in africa, joining one in morocco, senegal, uganda, and a permanent one in djibouti. u.s. drone attacks ordered by obama have spiked particularly in yemen, somalia, afghanistan, and notably pakistan where over 360 drone strikes over the nine years, 2004 to 2013, have killed over 3,000 people. this data is not classified. and not even secret. but it is troubling. so troubling that the u.n. has just decided to launch an investigation on the impacts of drone strikes on thousands of civilians. question. will the u.n. human rights council rule that drone use violates international law do
. he has been given the responsibility of winding down the u.s.'s longest war. he took command from a general john allen in the afghan capital city -- in the afghan city of kabul. >> today is not about change, it's about continuity. what has not changed is the will of this coalition. what has not changed is our commitment to accomplish the mission. more and courtly, what has not changed is the inevitability of our success. >> is facing some tough challenges, among them, republicans to question whether he's the right man for the job. >> with the u.s. looking forward to december, 2014 as the day u.s. combat forces are expected to leave afghanistan for good, a marine corps general is guarding his term as the last general to run the war in that country. >> i understand is much work to be dead and the challenges will be many. >> he lead a regiment of some 6000 troops into iraq in 2003 and spent much of his career at the pentagon, calling some to question his battlefield credentials. >> how much personal time have you had in afghanistan? >> senator, i have not served on assignment in afgh
through it right and appropriately protect any u.s. person information we come across and focus on the foreign intelligence. and again remember, nsa is part of the intelligence community right but their mission in the intelligence world is foreign intelligence. that operative word is foreign. >> right but that information also does get tans translated -- translated to folks locally who can deal with it. the fbi and other organizations for example. what -- mechanisms do you have from compliance -- are there any mechanism that is also like reach out to the other agencies for example in how you sort of coordinate your role compared with i mean -- you know we have 18 or so intelligence agencies. which obviously the director of national intelligence was created to sort of streamline. what's the connection you have maybe with the other intelligence organizations that exist across governments? >> sure. again kind of going back@rules i always -- to the rules, as a compliance person you start with the rules right? because we're kind of like the rules coaches. we're there to help people u
reversed course and agreed to provide a memo authorizing drone use to kill al-qaeda operatives including u.s. citizens abroad. joining us is dan henninger and george d.robinoewritz and dan cominsky. what have we learned about the policy this week. >> i think what we learned was an affirmation what we know about the drone policy. it was stated pretty well by john brennan. the bottom line is the drones are being used to kill al-qaeda or al-qaeda affiliated terrorists in northern pakistan and yemen but nowhere else. that there is a justice department memo laying out the legal justification for the drone attacks. it's not clear to me why the obama administration felt they had to keep that memo secret. it was going to come out eventually anyway but they do have a justification. that the drone attacks are being run by john brennan. >> paul: it coast goes back to the congressional authorization to use military force in the wake of 9/11 and succeeding national defense acts patched by congress. so dorothy, the left really does however, dislike this program or the way it is operated because there was
importantly, what has not changed is the inevitability of our success. >> the u.s. commander in afghanistan faces tough challenges. among them, republicans questioning whether he is the right man for the job. >> with the u.s. looking forward to december 31st, 2014, the day combat forces are leaving afghanistan for good, marine corps general dunford will probably be the last to run it. you lead a regiment of 6000 troops into iraq in 2003 and but he spent much of his year -- career in the pentagon. >> a much personal time have you had in afghanistan? >> i have not served an assignment in afghanistan. >> dunford will have to manage the politics in washington and kabul when it comes to recommending how quickly forces should withdraw. >> i look at the strength of the enemy, the capabilities of the afghans security forces. >> president obama has not decided how many will stay in the country or, for that matter, what they will be doing. once the decision has been made, it will be up to general dunford to make sure the plan works and the work of the last 12 years is not undone. >> iran is marking t
came to the u.s. in the u.s. to us recall that the other side and as a child i also thought [speaking in spanish] was the other side of the map. so i thought that's where the u.s. west, on the other side of this nonsense. >> host: when did you come to the u.s. and why? >> guest: i came to the u.s. when i was nine and a half years old back in 1985 and the reason why i.t. was because my parents were already here. my father left when i was too, my mother came anonymous one and a half and my father came back to mexico. he thought we weren't taking care of by the relatives we are left with and decided to release her because he changed his mind about coming back to mexico and decided we should join him here in the u.s. >> host: how did you get to the other side? >> guest: i had to run a lot. we had to cross the border illegally through tijuana. also the first two times we got caught by border patrol, my father was hesitant to bring me at first because i was nine and half of the time many thought it was too little for the journey. we did get caught the first two times i felt immensely guilty
the committee of any changes that have been made or are being proposed to the posture of u.s. forces overseas to respond to similar terrorist attacks in the future that we sought in benghazi. anything that will affect the dod and installations overseas. they released a timeline of its response to the assaults of september 11th and 12th and including on the deployment of various forces based in the united states or overseas. a copy of this timeline is in front of us. i think we will each have it and it will be included in the record. according to the timeline, the temporary mission facility, the department of defense's first reaction was to react on a mission of libya to provide better awareness of the events of the events in benghazi. there were a series of meetings in the pentagon for expanding the department of defense's response as well as to prepare for the potential outbreak of further violence throughout the region. during these meetings, secretary panetta authorized a number of deployments. i hope that secretary panetta and the chairman will provide the committee with detail on the cir
going on here? is there a manufacturing renaissance in america? what are you seeing? >> is the u.s.'s manufacturing more competitive than it has been in the past? yes. there are a number of drivers. in high-tech manufacturing, material innovation is happening. there is a lot of innovation and advanced manufacturing. materials are higher than it was in the past versus labor. the energy construct is being created by shale gas. the ability of u.s. companies to sell around the world and export in the markets that are growing. in the case of manufacturing, the future has a chance to be different from the past. we are at our most competitive in my 30 years on a globally relative basis. how does that translate to jobs? it is a more complicated equation on around productivity and other elements. will it go from 9% to 20%? that is unlikely. could you see a steady increase of manufacturing jobs in the u.s.? that is likely to happen. whether you get all 5 million back, i do not know. there will be productivity. there is a bigger opportunity for more content in the u.s. today. >> jack welsh on
for a penniless u.s. grows more compelling, giving ex-congressman kolbe hope. >> the polling is very clear that when people find out about the savings they're going to make it's substantial and willing to make that kind of change. >> according to him, not minting pennies would save the u.s. treasury about $45 million a year. and while we're on the subject, switching the paper dollar to a dollar coin would save $178 a year and a nickel now costs a dime to produce. quarter for your thoughts? thanks for watching "state of the union." i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu for analysis and extras. and if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. search "state of the union." "fareed zakaria: gps" is next. >>> this is "gps," the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a great show for you today and we begin with american politics. what is really happening? are the republicans on the defensive? will the automatic budget cuts happen? is there any chance of legislative deals? we have a great pane
, and how to present the program, how to do what you're doing now. host: your in the u.s., based in afghanistan, what are you doing here in washington? guest: i am here to say that open media in afghanistan is a big achievement. not only for the public, but for everyone i want to say that this is a big achievement after 11 years we lost more than 39 journalists from 2001 up until now, more than hundreds of injuries, more than thousands of arrests and people who were insulted and faced with harassment. let's not lose this achievement. a side of focus on security forces, stress fractures in afghanistan, focusing on media for lots of afghan people. afghans are quite aware what is freedom of expression and how they can use it in their daily lives. let's focus on it and not lose it. host: while you're in u.s., are you having to justify the money you are receiving? guest: yes, i have to justify the money we are receiving and say that not only for nai media institute, or the organizations we are receiving the money from, from ucid, the sector, the deal is something to really need focus.
the internet in the first place. back then, the u.s. was in the catbird seat, poised to lead the world down this astonishing new superhighway of information and innovation. now many other countries offer their citizens faster and cheaper access than we do. the faster high-speed access comes through fiber optic lines that transmit data in bursts of laser light, but many of us are still hooked up to broadband connections that squeeze digital information through copper wire. we're stuck with this old-fashioned technology because, as susan crawford explains, our government has allowed a few giant conglomerates to rig the rules, raise prices, and stifle competition. just like standard oil in the first gilded age a century ago. in those days, it was muckrakers like ida tarbell and lincoln steffens rattling the cages and calling for fair play. today it's independent thinkers like susan crawford. the big telecom industry wishes she would go away, but she's got a lot of people on her side. in fact, if you go to the white house citizen's petition site, you'll see how fans of "captive audience" are ca
department's view that it is legal for the government to kill u.s. citizens overseas if it believes they pose an "imminent threat," even if there is no evidence of an immediate specific attack. some ethicists say that amounts to illegal targeted killings. >> they are not the best strategy, they are not ethically right, and they are not morally right. >>> after much campaigning by outside groups on both sides, the boy scouts postponed until may a decision on lifting its ban on gay scouts and leaders. several conservative religious organizations were particularly vocal in their opposition to lifting the ban. there was also some religious support for changing the policy. about 70% of boy scout troops are sponsored by religious groups, the largest of which are mormons, followed by united methodists and catholics. >>> as faith groups continue to push for comprehensive immigration reform, some are now raising concerns over president obama's support for same-sex couples in his plan. the president wants to give same-sex couples the same rights as heterosexual couples, including the right to sponsor a
superstorm when it hits. >>> hurricane sandy threatening to unleash massive damage on the u.s. northeast. >> conditions are deteriorating very rapidly. >> certainly felt more rain, more wind, stronger gusts. >> i've never, in 26 years of forecasting, have seen anything like this. >> they are being called superstorms. fueled by changing climate, higher temperatures, and rising sea levels. >> climate change is real. it's here. it's going to happen again. >> people and cities once safe. now in the eye of the fury. >> i see the weather changing. absolutely. >> is this the era of the superstorm? >> water level is rising substantially. >> and are we ready? >> if this wall had been here -- >> for the next one? >> i've been telling everybody, the big flood is coming. we better start building the ark. >> living near the ocean, there's always that chance that the ocean is going to come take away everything that you've got. but never did i imagine that this was going to happen to me and my family and my community. >> even now, given all that has happened to him and his family, it is still hard for
with the case for drones and the future of u.s. troops in afghanistan. >> i strongly believe 3,000 is too little. and 30,000 is too many. >> then our political panel on the state of the union watching and the new chairman of the senate foreign relations committee. plus, the high price of a penny. i'm candy crowley. and this is "state of the union." engining mow now from his home state of kentucky, senator rand paul. thank you for joining thus morning. you are going to deliver the tea party response to the president's state of the union. why is that needed? you have an "r" behind your name and so does marco rubio, who will deliver the republican response. >> there is a movement in the republican party, that is very vocal. in the 2010 election, there was a lot of the movement that helped us win elections and they consider themselves mostly to be republican, they will occasionally chastise the republican establishment. they want an independent voice. >> is that what you intend to do? chastise the republican establishment? >> no, but i think really there are some things that i will emphasize that ma
. mort zuckerman, publisher of u.s. news and world report, publisher of "the daily news" and he has a few real estate holdings here and there. arianna huffington, chair, president, and editor in chief of "the huffington post" media group. and ed connor, visiting scholar at the american enterprise institute, former managing director at bane capital. arianna, do you think that the obama you're seeing now -- and one of the things i'm struck by is how the election changed the political climate. # the republicans seem on the defensive, trying to reinvent the plan. obama seems more confident. is this the new obama? is this the old obama? is this the real obama? >> well, the great thing for obama right now is that he has the public on his side. my concern right now -- and that's, i think, will determine which obama will actually prevail -- is that jobs and growth are not on his agenda. it is absolutely stunning. if you go back to the election, he kept campaigning around jobs, rebuilding our bridges, rebuilding our infrastructure, the american dream, saving it for the middle class. and both the r
fallen. the u.s. postal service suspended service. this mailbox here gives you an idea of how much snow is on the ground. same thing with the sidewalk that has been plowed here, but it's just insane, what people are having to go through even though they're used to it. i want to you listen to what some of the residents have to say. >> what was it the blizzard of '78, i think it was, and it was just like this deep also. maybe this is a little deeper. no. this is definitely deeper. >> this is the most snow i've ever seen. it's unbelievable. >> the storm is being blamed for at least five deaths in the united states including an 11-year-old boy in boston who died of carbon monoxide poisoning while waiting in a car as his father was digging out snow. the travel bans have been lifted in massachusetts and connecticut, but the state's governors are still urging caution. >> do not go on the roads. stay off the roads. first of all, they're not as safe as we would like them to be, secondly, there's a lot of blowing snow. thirdly, there are entrances and exits that are still not open. >> and some pi
was born. >> tropical storm sandy, heading straight for islands in the caribbean. >> the u.s. at least for now is not in the cone. >> the initial forecast, she might go out to sea, but that changed quickly. >> we were eight days ahead on this storm. we watched this thing on the computers turn left and turn right a couple of times before the one model said this is going to america. >> this could be a big storm as it makes that turn and slams directly into where new york and new jersey come together. >> seven days before the storm hit, computer predictions, called models, put landfall in new jersey. there was time to get ready, board up, evacuate. >> this morning i formally declared a state of emergency in anticipation of hurricane sandy. >> when the storm hit atlantic city on the 29th, it was just five miles, that's it, just five miles, from where the earliest forecast said it would cross the coastline. >> it's unprecedented. that's the best word i could use. there's no way any other storm in recent memory has been forecast that good, for that long. >> this pinpoint accuracy came from p
and fireworks came together to welcome in the year of the snake. festivities took place in the u.s. and around the world. >>> it's called the biggest night in music industry. we're talking about tonight and talking about the grammys in los angeles. nichelle turner says she's seeing tighter security because of that manhunt. >>> while the mayor of los angeles is making sure the grammys are safe and secure, he's also vowing to find a dangerous ex-cop. that's christopher dorner. a $1 million reward now on the table. let's go straight out to casey wian in los angeles. a record reward now being offered here, right? >> reporter: that's right. and lapd chief charlie beck said, martin, it was remarkably easy to raise the money for that million-dollar reward. the mayor of los angeles saying the money came from corporations, charitable organizations, law enforcement groups, the city, lots of people banding together, showing just how important this effort is to the city of los angeles. here's what the police chief and the mayor had to say at that news conference. >> this is an act, and make no mistake abo
the money." it is the u.s. government versus standard & poor's. the most aggressive move yet by the justice department to hold accountable a financial company at the center of the financial melt down of 2008. the $5 billion civil suit charges s&p intended to defraud investors, aaa ratings they did not deserve. standard & poor's' attorney says not so farst fast. >> the ratings that were issued were believed by the people who issued them and that's what the government has got to disprove, that -- the government's got to show in this case not that a lot of people lost money because of their investments. the government has to show that standard & poor's literally disbelieved the tradings. >> meanwhile, choppy week for the markets. dow with its worse day of the year on monday falling triple digits and then getting most of that back on tuesday. the markets rebounded later in the week. so what's next? >> i still think we're going to have a correction. the markets started the year with the investors pretty complacent. now they're almost euphoric. everybody you have on the program thinks the market
and this additional tax adds another sting to the injustice of doma. this brings great hope the u.s. supreme court will hear the california proposition perry case and various doma cases later this year. however, as a legislative body here in san francisco, i don't believe we can or should standstill and wait to see what the u.s. supreme court does while this discrimination continues. i look forward to working with everyone to get this passed. i am proud that this legislation is supporting and cosponsored by supervisors wiener, campos and chu, as well as the lgbt democrat democratic club and lgbt. we have prided ourselves of being ahead of curve and the props of a better tomorrow. as a city we should not stand idle as contributing members of society -- with hope and uncertainty certainty that the u.s. supreme court will find doma cases unreasonable. colleagues i hope i can for your support. we have a number of speakers to speak. >> good morning, controller's office. this legislation if passed by the board of supervisors and signed by the mayor would take effect next fiscal year and the departme
more. >> what do you do? >> i have a system. as a surgeon you learn, it's like being in the u.s. army, you have to get up around the same exact time. the internal clock is important. even without the alarm, your body is used to it. when you go to bed your melatonin picks up. your sugar level is down, so when you wake up, you want a complete breakfast. studies show exercise before breakfast makes you lose weight. that's the best time of the day, it energizes you. between 5:00 a.m. and 7:00 a.m. is when you do your entire day of work before anybody else wakes up. >> 5:00 a.m. to 7:00 a.m. is when i like to sleep. >> and end up with a nosebleed. >> great show. thanks. >>> we start this hour with a fox news extreme weather alert. the massive clean up under way in the northeast. a mess, following the historic blizzard that dumped nearly 3 feet of snow. the storm can blamed for at least five deaths, including a five-year-old boy in boston. right now crews all over the northeast are hard at work, trying to restore power to as many as 345,000 people who still don't have heat or electricity. t
of u.s. economy, economists predicting just a 2% growth this year, which is not much, many hope much of the president's speech focuses on the u.s. economy, neil cavuto will cover the speech all night tuesday night right here on fox business. but first, to tucker carlson, monica metta and a guy who will cover it with neil tuesday is peter. >> the white house said that president's inaugural address laided up on some big themes that president wants to talk about and advance in his second term, that we need to wait for state of the union for him to get into some detail on what he wants to do. so, we are expecting that he will offer more details but, i would not expect any change in broad themes. liz: what we're expecting is gun violence, immigration reform, and tax reform, and energy? what is missing? >> climate change, we'll talk about that too. these are the issues that the president cares about. liz: what is missing? >> growth. the president's main concern is income inequality, he does not read the w "wall street journal" he is focused on leveling the play are feel. liz: month da ca l
, and persistence" in an interview in maryland, arrest o'connell talked to the history of the u.s. marine corps. it's about fifteen minutes. as part of the university series we like to visit campuses across the country and talk with professors who are authors. this week we're at the u.s. navel academy in maryland. joining us is aaron oh connell who is also the authority of this book "underdog: the making of the modern ma marine corps.." what was it established? >>1775. but the birthday is something of a myth. the marines claim 10, november, 1775. that's actually just the date that congress authorized the creation of the marine corps. .. it's a very small part of the navy. the burning cars completely separate from the navy now. >> they are completely her. this became contentious throughout the course history. they would claim they should follow the rules of the navy. when they shared the regulation of the army and eventually in 1832 they became a separate service inside. >> host: had their mission change? guests at the mission to change so much. there midship urged into the 20 century, but there wer
to kill a whole bunch of u.s. citizens over detroit on christmas day. this guy's a bad guy. our options were limited. this was a tool we could use to stop further terrorist attacks against americans. i supported it then. monthly, i have my commit go to the c.i.a. to review them. i as chairman review every single airstrike that we use in the war on terror both from the civilian and military side when it comes to terrorist strikes. there is plenty of oversight here. there's not an american list somewhere overseas for targeting. that does not exist. and i think there's been some sensationalism. this is a serious matter, but i do think the oversight rules have been, i think-- >> schieffer: it is an extremely complicated matter. but what about the argument that civil liberties groups make that if a person is a u.s. citizen, if even if he's a bad guy he has certain rights after the constitution. and you can't just say "okay, we're going to kill him." >> in the united states, that's true. if you join forceses with the enemy, we have a long-standing tradition in this country that that in and of
. >>> 11 deaths in the u.s. are being blamed on the storm. three more people have died in canada. here in maryland it's a different scene. let's take a live look outside. it's a sunny day. meteorologist bernadette woods is live with an updated look at t warning live doppler radar. it was so nice to see that sun today. felt like we haven't seen it forever. >> it was beautiful out there. and temperatures starting to creep up closer to average around the region today but that's going to change tomorrow because of the next storm system moving our way. temperatures starting to drop somewhat. 37 degrees in baltimore. 40s in the west and 40s to the south. we're not going to drop all that much tonight. at the same time a new storm comes our way and notice in garrett county and along the maryland border there a freezing rain advisory is going to go into effect in the overnight hours and because of this storm system right here. it's coming from the south with warmer air and when it arrives it is going to be in the form of rain for most of maryland and tempera
with the u.s. government not paying interest on its debt, then god knows what would have happened. this is not like that. this is something where the negative effects kick in gradually. the world won't end if we go a month into this thing, so he can afford to wait, where i believe the republicans will have to cave eventually. what he should be looking for is i think some face-saving way for everybody to just kick this can down the road. we could have some vague spending cuts promised in the future, some real revenue sources. >> all in the future. >> all in the future. this is a terrible time to do us a terry. >> i think his reaction depends on whether or not the republicans can hold their coalition together. and if they can create a coalition that holds together, which might even include some democrats, i think they can prevail on this issue and get a small amount of cost reduction. i think if they shy away from -- >> do you want to see some us a terry now? >> they have to demonstrate some ability to manage the costs over the long run if you want to see the private sector grow as
, california and northern mexico are in on the manhunt. the u.s. border patrol is on alert, looking for dorner. one big concern for tonight in particular is that he is here in downtown los angeles for the grammy i awards, held at the staples center. there's always a big law enforcement presence but tonight the los angeles police department is very concerned and they have extra security out there, road blocks are already out because, as you know, the police department has been named as a target. >> everyone there certainly has to be on alert. thank you very much. we'll check back with you as the investigation develops. >>> now back to the great sunday cleanup across the northeast following the historic blizzard. some places piled up an inch of snow an hour. in connecticut, a record 34 inches snow dumped across the state and paralyzed travel to the point the national guard was brought in to help. >>> anna, the ban on travel was lifted in new england. what's going on in connecticut? >> reporter: in massachusetts and connecticut, the travel bans were lifted but the governors are urging residents t
paychecks and on may 18th, the current debt ceiling suspension ends. with no deal even the threat of the u.s. defaulting could again result in the downgrade of america's credit rating. the consequences for you could be dire. your borrowing costs would likely rise along with your taxes. you could expect cuts to the programs and government services you rely on. jon king is cnn's national correspondent. jon, president obama says he wants a big deal on budgets and debt. he won the battle for public opinion. he won a second term while congressional approval continues to be super low. is there something more he could be doing to end the small thinking about big problems that has become the norm in our nation's capital? >> he still wants the grand bargain he's been talking about for several years. this past week he came out and said we need another temporary fix. the term sequester is essentially a fancy word for the president and congress not doing their jobs. you laid it out pretty clearly. the president is late submitting his own budget. so he's part of the problem, too. but he does have the upp
. in fact we spend about 1% of the world's energy just making fertilizer for corn in the u.s. if that corn could take the nigtrogeghtrogen out of the air it like beans do, then we wouldn't have to fertilize corn. another important problem, we don't have enough drugs for diseases. we see these multidrug-resistant microbes popping up in hospitals and it's kind of scary. we need better drugs, i think this is an area where synthetic biology can really help. if you look around this room, nearly everything that we're in contact with is derived from petroleum. the carpet on the floor, the paint on the walls, the ceiling tiles, they all come from petroleum we have the potential to produce all of these products from sugar. so it could open up an entirely new avenue for agriculture, it could open up an environmentally-friendly way to produce all of these products that we use on a day-to-day basis. >> is that part of what drives you? do you look at the world just differently as a result of knowing how sugar could be substituted for these petroleum-based products? >> i don't know if i look at the worl
immigrants who are illegal in the u.s., and securing the border, a fault of the 1986 bill, the president and congress did not do enough. caller: 40% of the illegal immigration problem comes from our airports. they overstay their visas. nobody makes them leave. the people of the world know that once you are in america, nobody makes you leave. until that changes, we are going to have out of control immigration, overpopulation, relative to the economy, we will have a rising levels of poverty, lower standards of living. a pro-immigrant admit is that they will all be entrepreneurs and they will all start the next google. that is a myth. host: cindy has this on our twitter page -- way, a reminder that we will have live coverage of the president's state of the union address on the c-span networks, including radio. our prie-dieu will get underway at around 8:00 eastern. we will kory-error the president's speech at approximately 11:00 eastern time. -- re-air the president's speech at approximately 11:00 eastern time. there is this -- as a reminder, let's go to the president's state of the union a
programs. >> yet, 73% of americans say cutting government spending is more likely to strengthen the u.s. economy so gary b, are these automatic cuts actually good? >> the best thing i think that could happen. you know, obama should go back to his purge on the billionaires saying they should give more. because in this case, brenda, for the past five years, the government has been the billionaires, during the first two years under the obama administration, discretionary spending increased 84%. it's toned down a little bit, thankfully, but even if you include hurricane sandy relief it's 30%. so we're talking about such a large space that this -- these cuts amount to one half of 1% of the gdp. so, brenda, the other question is, is it going to hurt the economy? bill clinton, who the democrats love and also admittedly some republicans cut discretionary spending from 22 to 18% of gdp and what happened in the economy? this is the way to kind of tighten the belt, i think is the best thing that could happen. >> some of the things are draconian. there are a lot of cuts that might be surprising and
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 194 (some duplicates have been removed)